Divination and Prophecy in the Harry Potter Novels (Part 3)

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, by J.K. Rowling, cover artThis is the third and final article in a series about J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter novels.  To read from the beginning, click here for the first article, “The Harry Potter Controversy”.  In this third installment of the series, I try to answer some objections that might arise in relation to the place of divination in the Harry Potter series.

Harry Potter: Divination and Prophecy

At this point in the series, someone might object that while I have dispatched the general problem of magic in these children’s books—magic is just Rowling’s metaphor for spiritual power—there is still the whole issue of divination, which the Bible explicitly forbids (as I noted in “The Harry Potter Controversy”). After all, Harry and his best friend Ron take divination class for several years from the divination teacher at Hogwarts, Professor Trelawney. How can this not be worrying for Christian parents? Doesn’t it cast the occult in a positive light?

There are several reasons I think parents should not be worried about the place of divination in the Harry Potter novels. First, Continue reading

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Allegory in Harry Potter (Part 2)

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, by J.K. Rowling, cover artThis article is the second in a series about J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter novels.  To read from the beginning, click here for the first article, “The Harry Potter Controversy”.  In this second installment of the series, I make the positive case for Christian allegory in Harry Potter.

Allegory in Harry Potter

In making a case for allegory in Harry Potter, my point is that certain characters and events in these books stand as symbolic representations of central characters and events in Christian theology. Continue reading

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Harry Potter: Controversy (Part 1)

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, by J.K. RowlingI have a confession to make: I’m a Harry Potter fanatic.  Prior to last summer I had been enjoying each of the Harry Potter movies as they were released, but I had yet not read any of J.K. Rowling’s children’s books.

However, last summer, right before my family and I went on an extended road trip, my wife, Angela, and I saw Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, which covers the story through the sixth of the seven Potter books.  While we enjoyed the movie, it left us desperate to know what happens next (as those of you who have seen the movie know, it ends on a more mysterious and fraught note than any of the others).  So, we checked the seventh and last book in the series out of the library—Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Book 7)Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by J.K. Rowling—and took it on our road trip, reading it aloud to each other in the front seat (while our kids watched DVDs with headphones on in the back seat; at six and eight, they’re still too young for Potter, but their time will come…). Continue reading

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